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Southern England

April 2013

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May 2013

A week in the UK to escape the madness of Kings Day in Amsterdam. We took the ferry by car and visited some of the oldest and most iconic landscapes and towns of southern England.

The white cliffs of Dover! Magnificent sight from the Calais-Dover ferry.
The Gallivant, our first overnight stay near the old town of Rye.
High Street in the lovely and very old former port town of Rye.
How very British indeed!
Rye
Rye
Rye
Typical old Tudor style buildings
The history of Mermaid Street and the famous Mermaid Inn go back to the middle of the 12th Century.
Rye
Rye
The steep cobbled Mermaid Street leads up to the front door of Mermaid Inn. The cellars of the Mermaid Inn date from 1156.
The graveyard behind Ypres Tower, the oldest building in Rye.
Rye
This austere castle was built in 1385 by Sir Edward Dalyngrigge, a former knight of Edward III.
Bodiam Castle
Bodiam Castle
Bodiam Castle
Bodiam Castle
Gerrards Cross in Buckinghamshire; Hans & Toyoko lived here in the early 1970's after they left Japan.
Bulstrode Camp in Gerrards Cross
Unfortunately their old house has gone and was replaced not too long ago by these big and quite monstruous villas.
Marlborough
The Wellington Arms is one of the old pubs in town.
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This is where we stayed for two nights to explore the Bath area.
The Inn has been welcoming travellers since the 15th Century, when it was built as a rest stop for coaches running the London to Wells road.
The Glastonbury Abbey was founded in the 7th century and enlarged in the 10th, before a major fire in 1184 destroyed the buildings.
It was rebuilt and by the 14th century was one of the richest and most powerful monasteries in England.
Glastonbury Abbey
The only building to survive intact over the centuries is the Abbott's Kitchen (left in this picture) which served as a Quaker meeting house.
Glastonbury is frequently associated with the legend of King Arthur, a connection promoted by medieval monks who asserted that Glastonbury was Avalon.
Glastonbury Abbey
Glastonbury Abbey
The George Hotel and Pilgrims' Inn was built in the late 15th century.
Glastonbury
Glastonbury
In the little white cottage with the golden lion, the Blonk family spent a memorable summer holiday vacation in the early 70's.
40 years later, the house and surroundings appear virtually unchanged.
The Glastonbury Tor once was an island and seems to have been called Ynys yr Afalon (meaning ‘The Isle of Avalon’) by the Brits.
The present Cathedral building in Wells, dating between 1175 and 1490, has been described as ‘the most poetic of the English Cathedrals’.
Wells
Wells
Wells
Wells
Victorian fittings from the middle of the 19th century.
Wells
The beautiful roof structure of the Chapter house.
Details of the Chapter house
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The stairs to the Chapter house and Vicars Close.
The Wells clock, an astronomical clock, is located in the north transept.
Wells
Wells
In the 15th century the Vicars Close was built to house the choral men.
Wells
Wells
Wells
Yet another 15th century coaching inn, in Wells town center.
La Gauloise anno 2013
We’re on our way to the Cheddar Gorge which unfortunately proved to be a tourist trap, so no pictures from the gorge...
The city of Bath was first established as a spa with the Latin name, Aquae Sulis by the Romans sometime in the AD 60s.
The Romans built baths and a temple on the surrounding hills of Bath in the valley of the River Avon around hot springs.
Bath became popular as a spa town during the Georgian era.
Bath
The old Roman baths are about 4 meters below the present street level and are visually connected by these late 19th century balconies.
Bath
A model with cross sections of the old Roman baths.
Bath
Bath
Along the river Avon.
The 18th-century Pulteney Bridge.
Bath
The Circus is a fine example of Georgian architecture.
The Circus
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The Royal Crescent
The Royal Crescent
The Royal Crescent
Brock Street connects the Circus with the Royal Crescent.
Stonehenge
Archaeologists believe Stonehenge was built anywhere from 3000 BC to 2000 BC.
Throughout the 20th century, Stonehenge began to be revived as a place of religious significance by Neo-druids.
Today, it is a tourist trap that feels enormously fake. So sad, considering the long and rich history of this place.
Still, it's quite photogenic...
With the camera near the ground you don’t see the hundreds of surrounding tourists and busses...
just some overly bureaucratic symbolism...
The last big cathedral of our trip: Canterbury
Very lively town square
Gateway to the Cathedral grounds from the Buttermarket.
Founded in 597, the cathedral was completely rebuilt after a fire between 1070 to 1077.
Canterbury Cathedral
Canterbury Cathedral
Canterbury Cathedral
Canterbury Cathedral
A pivotal moment in the history of the Cathedral was the murder of the archbishop, Thomas Becket, in December 1170 by knights of King Henry II.
The king had frequent conflicts with the strong-willed Becket and is said to have exclaimed in frustration, “Who will rid me of this turbulent priest?”
The posthumous veneration of Becket made the cathedral a place of pilgrimage.
This brought both the need to expand the cathedral, and the wealth that made it possible.
Canterbury Cathedral
Canterbury Cathedral
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Canterbury Cathedral
Canterbury Cathedral
These stacked chairs also become some kind of modern relics in these austere surroundings.
Canterbury Cathedral
Canterbury Cathedral
Canterbury Cathedral
Incredible that that door can still be opened!
The Friars in Canterbury
St Peter’s Lane
Canterbury
The Relish, nice B&B in the coastal town of Folkestone.
The Relish
Time for the Dover ferry back to the mainland!
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by @just-edo in Spain